Unmanned Aircraft Systems

For emergencies, call Public Safety at 911. Report any crash, injury or property damage to EHS at 609-258-5294.

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Flying a sUAS at Princeton

Small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS), also referred to as drones, model airplanes or remote control aircraft, are controlled aircraft without an onboard pilot. In higher education, the uses for sUAS are growing rapidly as technology advances and changes in federal regulations make possible a wide array of applications in research, education, and operations.

Princeton University has instituted procedures and policies for the use of sUAS, and follows the latest FAA guidance in setting rules for sUAS operation. Policies are designed to ensure that use of sUAS by students and researchers on campus is conducted in a safe, responsible manner. Use of sUAS that is intrusive of personal privacy, or endangers the security of anyone in the Princeton community, will not be tolerated.
 
To learn more about how sUAS technology is being used at Princeton, check out our blog
 
 

Blog: Updates From the Field

Drone Flights For Research, Recreation Move to Forrestal
March 16, 2022

With the beginning of construction on the Lake Campus Development in West Windsor, Princeton University has suspended the use of the recreational area south of Lake Carnegie known as West Windsor Fields. As a result, the Princeton small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) program has arranged for flights to move to the James Forrestal Campus in Plainsboro.

New FAA Rules Require Certification For All Drone Pilots
Aug. 27, 2021

Whether you are flying a drone for recreation, education or business purposes, the FAA now requires certification through one of several options. 

News and Events

Drone-Mounted Sensors Can Help Fight Wildfires
Aug. 30, 2022

As climate change leads to larger and more frequent wildfires, researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are using sensors, drones and machine learning to both prevent fires and reduce their damage to the electric grid.  Engineers are honing technology to remotely sense electrical arcing and faulty…

As drone popularity increases, feds look to rein in bad behavior
Dec. 6, 2021

The Salem, Va., firefighters were standing outside on a summer day in 2019 when a drone — its blades whirling in a high-pitched whine — headed right for them, sending them scurrying, authorities said.

For emergencies, call Public Safety at 911. Report any crash, injury or property damage to Environmental Health & Safety at 609-258-5294.